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WOW

Belfast Child- Chapter 5- Surrounded by Madness

Back in Belfast life went on as normal as possible in the circumstance’s and although my early memories of mum occasionally drifted into my mind, gradually mum became a vague memory of my childhood world. Once, a boy at school asked me where my mother was and I remember being …

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Belfast Child- Chapter 4-The Glorious 12th

Like the vast majority of Protestants in Northern Ireland apart from my Birthday, Christmas and our family holiday to Ballyferris, the 12th of July was the biggest and most important day of the year. In 1663 the Protestant King Billy defeated the Catholic King James at the Battle of Boyne …

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Belfast Child- Chapter 3

Proud to be a Prod By 1972 ,when I was 6 years old I had all but forgotten or at least suppressed my early years with mum and her Catholic side of the family. I started to become very aware of the fact that I was Protestant and that the …

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The night we saw Fannie Foxe.

There were three of us, that night in 1963. Me, Larry and Frenchie Laton. We took a bus ride up to Baltimore to spend an evening at the old Gaiety Burlesque Theatre on East Baltimore Street. To get there it was necessary to take a bus ride from the fort to The …

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Belfast Child- Chapter 2- GLENCAIRN

On a sunny day in 1970 my osteomyelitis was finally given the all clear and I was on my way home from the hospital, for a couple of years at least. I was so heartbroken to leave Nurse Brown, that on the day of my discharge I hid in a …

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Belfast Child Chapter One- Mum & Dad

My father John was born in 1944 and was the first of five sons and one daughter born to my grandparents, John and Suzy Chambers, who were both hard core loyalists from the Sandy Row area of Belfast. Dad’s early years were typical of working class Protestants of the time, …

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Belfast Child: My Story- An Autobiography

Remembering the Innocent Victims This story is dedicated to the memory of all innocent victims of the Troubles, regardless of political or religious background, including members of the British army and other security force personnel whom died as a direct result of the Troubles. Life’s hard enough without having to worry that …

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