Monday , September 27 2021

Jake Scott

Jake is a Master’s student of Political Theory at the University of Birmingham in the UK with a focus on ideology, and edits the online publication “The Mallard” for conservative students. He is interested in poetry, fiction, moral and aesthetic philosophy, history and, of course, politics. He considers himself a traditional conservative, and focuses on social and cultural conservatism, describing his economic stance as a “reluctant capitalist”.

The road away from conservatism

The following is a joint piece from Jake Scott and Angus Gillan Intro  The greatest obstacle facing Boris Johnson is the clear lack of a philosophy at present. As the oldest political party, still active, in history, with a record of continued and effectual governing, one would be quite right …

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To Conserve Nothing

In logic, there is a form of fallacy called the “slippery slope argument”, the belief (as defined here) that “a course of action ought to be rejected because, with little or no evidence, one insists that it will lead to a chain reaction resulting in an undesirable end or ends”. …

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Why I am Quitting Netflix

The internet erupted in furore on Thursday when news broke of a film called ‘Cuties’ being published by the online streaming service Netflix. The film is billed as an empowering story of a young girl who defies her ‘conservative family’s wishes’ (yes, this is the description on Netflix) and joins …

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Have we reached peak hysteria yet?

“There will be a food shortage” – unfeasible, but forgivable. “The NHS will run out of key pharmaceuticals” – extraordinarily unlikely. “The buses will grind to a halt” – absurd, yet a welcome relief for car drivers. Project Fear 2.0 has been ramping up rapidly over the last few weeks, …

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Where is the Beauty in Buildings?

A recent article on CapX from Radomir Tylecote[1] argued that we have turned our backs on the architectural traditions of our Western heritage, and in the process lost our connection to our own history and the generations that built it. Tylecote argues well, and makes a strong case for reintroducing …

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#Brexit: A Chance for Conservatism’s Intellectual Revival

As it stands, the Conservative Party is divided on most things: laterally, there is a distinction between the modernisers and traditionalists, who – contrary to popular belief – do not fall neatly into the “liberal” and “illiberal” groups; and vertically, there is a distinction between the grassroots and the leadership. …

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#Brexit and the Legitimacy of Procedure

Brexit: will it happen? Should it happen? Can it happen? You would think, from the challenges made to Brexit from Gina Miller’s legal challenge to Dominic Grieve’s political manoeuvrings to the House of Lords’ implication that the British people did not know what they were voting for, that the answer to these questions is …

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12 Principles of Conservatism: The Wisdom of Jordan Peterson

Jordan B. Peterson has been described as the most influential thinker in the West. His book, 12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos has been an instant best-seller, despite being described by Guardian columnist John Crace as a “pseudointellectual ideology.” Peterson has been making waves for a while now, …

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Turning Back the Socialist Ratchet

In the 1980s, the post-war period from 1945 to 1979 came to be described in right-wing circles as a “socialist ratchet” – even though the Conservatives were in government for most of this period, the attitude of “managed decline” and that socialism had become a prevailing consensus made it difficult …

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